80 Feet Back: Centurion Enzo SV233

Centurion Boats

I've said it before and I'll say it again: Wakesurfing has revolutionized stock ballast settings. That statement couldn't be more true for Centurion. Since the folks at Centurion are focused on the consumer's surfing experience, they've plumbed in more ballast than most consumers typically want or can even handle for wakeboarding. Just take a look at the Centurion Enzo SV233's ballast stats under our "rider settings" list. You'll notice that, as I tested the boat, I didn't even fill all of the available ballast — which was pretty unsettling at first. I've been so trained to think that stock ballast is never enough when I'm free-riding, but that just wasn't the case with the SV233, considering it's 4,225 pounds of stock ballast — not including Ramfill. Since it's geared for a killer surf wave right out of the box, the stock ballast is distributed more stern-heavy. To adjust this for wakeboarding, simply redistribute the weight toward the bow, and the wake will shape up quite nicely.

During my test of the SV233’s wake, I was really impressed with just how big and clean it was. It was a lot of fun to ride. It popped hard, landed soft, the transition was steep, and yet it wasn’t finicky at all — which can be a common issue among wakes with steep transitions. There was no tendency to wash out or list when I edged out. And that brings me to another great thing about this wake: It’s really customizable, with features like the Centurion Articulating Tracking System (CATS), which balances the wake left to right without adjusting the weight distribution, and the Wing Plate, which adjusts the attitude of the boat, changing the shape of the wake from steep to rampy. All in all, you can really get into the details and fine-tune the perfect wake for anyone in your crew. Pretty impressive!

Centurion Boats
AARON KATEN